Category Archives: Health Insurance

The Importance of Good Records

Keeping your own records of any medical care that you and your immediate family have received is the only way to be sure that your insurance and bills are free from mistakes. It may seem unimportant now, but later in life when you try to get life insurance or get treatment that is appropriate for you, the importance will be in the spotlight. Everything from your allergies to your payment records with medical facilities can hurt you if they are wrong in your report. You could be given improper treatment or even denied treatment at all. By keeping your own records, you can dispute anything that is false.

Would you believe that you could be denied a job because of something erroneous on your medical records? It is true; if you are reported to have a disability, whether it is true or not, you could be turned down. You would be labeled as a risk, especially if the company offers insurance; they would know that you are going to cost more money to employ. The same goes for applying for health insurance where your medical records show that you would require prescription drugs, doctor visits, and increased chance of emergencies. It is quite the ordeal if you do in fact have a disability, but imaging if you did not have one at all-you would be turned down for insurance, while also being completely ineligible for disability financial help.

An example of a mistake that could be made on your record would be a diagnosis error. Perhaps you request that your doctor check a suspicious lump in your breast. On the first visit he may suspect that it is cancer. Most people will get a second opinion or go for a more thorough conclusive examination. If the second doctor decides that it is only a cyst and has it removed, your personal records would show that you are cancer-free. However, if this visit was documented incorrectly, or not at all, you may have trouble getting insured and not know why. If you had a record of the second visit that found the cyst, this situation would be easily disputed and your record would be accurate.

Human error is simply a part of life, even on medical documents. It is important to always keep your own records so that insurance companies get accurate information about you and your health condition. If you are being turned down for insurance and do not know why, you are best advised to be sure that you are not being misrepresented within your medical records. This problem can be cleared up quickly and easily if you are responsible enough to keep your own personal records.

Insurance When You are Getting Married

Health insurance providers are not created equal. Before a couple is married, the option of sharing coverage is extremely unusual unless one of your insurers offers domestic partner insurance. As you become engaged, if you both have separate insurance it is important to talk about the both of you switching to the better plan once you are married. There are a few factors consider, which include deductibles, co-payments, and the benefits of each separate plan. Marriage is a big step, and it can be done with ease if the two of you settle important decisions such as your health insurance plan before you take the big leap.

Your deductible is the amount you must pay each year to start your policy. Once this payment is made you will be responsible for whatever amount of co-payment your insurance company requires for you to pay for the health expenses that are covered in your particular policy. The amount of co-payments that you will be responsible for is established at the time you agree to your health insurance policy. It is going to be a certain percentage of health expenses; for instance, you pay 10% while your insurer will be paying the other 90%. You and your fiancé should compare both of your plans and figure out which deductible and co-payment plan seems most appropriate for the two of you.

Married couples are usually eligible for certain benefits that unmarried couples are not. Being insured separately by the health care provider sponsored by your employers may no longer be the most beneficial option for you. If you or your fiancé has insurance, and the other does not, once the two of you are married they can be added to the other partner’s plan. Cost of adding an additional person is definitely something that should be examined. You should not be required to pay more for adding a spouse or even a child in the future because most plans are offered to immediate family at no extra cost. The best way to compare policies is to estimate a yearly amount of normal health expenses, emergencies, co-payments, and deductibles. Whichever plan has the lowest cost to you will almost always be the best choice.

In addition to sharing health insurance with your new spouse, you may also want to consider switching the rest of your insurance plans, such as the policies you have for your separate automobiles. This is because most companies will give you a discount on having more than one vehicle insured. You may also be interested in finding a company that can insure you home, automobile, and health in one place. If you carry more than one policy with a company, they will also usually give you some sort of discount on them. It is important to sit down and discuss insurance with your fiancé because the two of you could be saving money and stress by figuring out what decision is best before the time comes.